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Title

GRASP Patterns and Principles Memo II

Course

Software Engineering

Abstract

Describe seveal design patterns.

Author

Douglas Troy

Source

Larman, Craig. Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development (3rd Edition), 2004.

Genre

Memo

Assignment Duration

Less than a week

Communication Skill

Reading
Writing

Technical Skill

Design

Workplace Scenario

The purpose of this assignment is to introduce four additional GRASP patterns: Polymorphism, Indirection, Pure Fabrication and Protected Variations. GRASP stands for General Responsibility Assignment Software Patterns or Principles. Recall that a pattern is a named and well-known problem/solution pair that can be applied in new contexts, with advice on how to apply it in novel situations and discussion of its trade-offs, implementations, and variations. So a pattern is not a new idea. Rather, it is a tried-and-true principle. A knowledge of patterns can help you in your future software design endeavors. To quote the author, “The critical design tool for software development is a mind well educated in design principles.”

In this memo to your supervisor you will summarize several design principles and patterns and you will explain an example of a time that you employed polymorphism and the concept behind the protected variations pattern.

Team Size

N/A

Files

Citation

Douglas Troy, “GRASP Patterns and Principles Memo II,” Incorporating Communication Outcomes into the Computer Science Curriculum, accessed September 25, 2017, http://cs-comm.lib.muohio.edu/items/show/75.

License

Creative Commons License

Comments

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